WIU Chemistry Major Spends Summer in REU Program

 

MatteaScanlan

Mattea Scanlan

Western Illinois University senior chemistry major Mattea Scanlan, of Platteville, WI, spent her summer conducting research through the prestigious Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program. Scanlan was one of three WIU students chosen for the honor, which is coordinated and funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

 

The highly competitive research positions give students between $4,500-$5,000 to use for travel expenses and room and board. The opportunity allows the students to work with top scientists in their field.

 

Scanlan spent her summer at Indiana University (IU) working with IU Professor Sara Skrabalak on the synthesis of branched nanocrystals. The nine-week program ended in July.

 

“I started with a standard procedure and then varied aspects of the procedure to see how it affected the shape, size and symmetry of the final product,” said Scanlan. “At the end of the summer, I presented my research findings in a poster at the IU Materials Symposium.”

 

Scanlan said she also had the opportunity to learn more about chemistry-related topics through weekly seminars.

 

“These included things like graduate school, scientific ethics, patents and research areas of other faculty at IU,” she said. “I was able to network with the other undergraduate REU students, IU graduate students and faculty I met.”

 

Scanlan said her experiences at Western helped her during her time in Indiana.

 

“At Western, I have performed chemistry research for multiple semesters, which helped me to understand how a lab worked when I got to IU,” she said. “That allowed me to build upon the lab skills I already knew. The chemistry classes I had taken gave me the background I needed to better understand the chemistry behind the research I was doing.

 

She added that without the support of faculty and friends at WIU, she wouldn’t have had the experience necessary to be accepted to the REU program.

For more information about the REU program, visit nsf.gov/crssprgm/reu/.

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WIU chemistry major Mattea Scanlan (right) with Indiana University Professor Sara Skrabalak at the Materials Symposim where I presented my findings (photo credit: Leah Buck).

 

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Recent grads on their ‘chain’ of successful events

What can a degree from WIU do for you?

For two students who came back to campus recently at WIU-QC, the answer is: find a solid career with one of the world’s most well-known corporations.

WIU-Quad Cities faculty and community leaders welcomed recent grads Jennifer Gibson (left) and Kim Goodwin (right) back to campus recently, where they reunited with their professor, James (a.k.a. “Jim”) Patterson, who serves as assistant dean/associate professor of the QC supply chain management — and was a warehouse supervisor before earning his Ph.D. and entering academia.

 

photo of professor Jim Patterson and students

Recent WIU-QC grads reunite with their professor, Jim Patterson, in Riverfront Hall

Gibson, who graduated with a bachelor’s degree, and Goodwin, who earned her MBA, both focusing on supply chain management, credited their coursework in areas such as warehouse management; and having required internships, for helping them secure employment as product buyers for John Deere Davenports Works. (The John Deere World Headquarters is based in nearby Moline, Illinois, where WIU-QC is located.)

“Those courses, and having professors who have had real-world experience in the industry, really prepared us,” she said. She also credited the opportunity to participate in a case competition, competing with students from other universities to solve an industry problem. “Things like that really help you develop the critical-thinking and decision- making that you use every day on the job.”

Gibson and Goodwin were invited back to campus recently for a Planning and Advisory Committee meeting, to detail ways that their degrees from WIU-QC, their internship experiences, and their real-world learning experiences in the program prepared them for their positions.

Cortez ready to serve on WIU-QC’s growing SGA

What’s the story behind a guy who says the love of a big river, and of museums, brought him to Western Illinois University-Quad Cities — and what’s he planning to do to bring more students together on the Quad Cities campus?

2017-05-SGA-president-Michael-Cortez-sitting-VPC-color-correctedMichael (“Mike) Cortez, a graduate student in Museum Studies at Western Illinois University-Quad Cities, has been elected president of the WIU-QC Student Government Association (SGA). And he’s got big plans on where he wants to see SGA go.

Back Story:

  • hometown: Des Moines, IA
  • bachelor’s degree in history in May 2015, Grand View University
  • first-year graduate student in Museum Studies program

Why Does He Want to Lead?

Cortez was elected by the student body in April, after a two-day process, he says, of meeting as many people as he could by “…shaking hands with people, introducing myself, just poking into classrooms or the library and I think I walked the campus six or seven times, if not more, over a two-day period.

“I try to get the message out to students that ‘this is your campus,’” he continued. “As soon as you walk through the doors, you take control of your journey, educationally and intellectually, so why not have a voice? Why not get involved?”

Cortez previously served SGA as a senator for GEMS, the Graduate Experience in Museum Studies student organization.

“Now that I’ve had a year to settle in, I’m really excited to take this next big step,” he said.

As an undergraduate student at Grand View, Cortez served as vice president of the history club and and the president of the LGBTQ student organization.

“I’ve always been actively involved,” he said. “I enjoy talking with people, giving speeches, going to meetings, being hands-on and being part of something bigger than myself.”

Growing Student Government on a Commuter Campus – More Events for All

“In the past, SGA wasn’t getting the student involvement that it should, with maybe one executive officer attending meetings. We have about 10 people who come to meetings now. It has grown quite a bit in the last three to four years, and we’re on much more solid footing now.

“My first priority is to make sure that every student voice is heard,” he continued. Second, I’d like to see increased involvement with activities on campus, and third, to strengthen the bond and relationship with the Macomb campus. We’ll continue having wonderful events such as Casino Night. I’d love to see us add a fall concert, art shows, and a Multicultural Night.

“WIU-QC really embraces non-traditional students who have families and who work, and we have a lot of veterans, but we also have traditional-aged college students. So one of my big priorities over the summer is to be thinking about, ‘How do we involve all types of students and not just one group?”

Why Western?: Tuition, location, and….the Mighty Mississip.’

“A big factor was in-state tuition, because in-state tuition announcement,” he said. “But another reason is  I’m a huge water person — love large bodies of water. And the Mississippi River is a beautiful sight to see. Also, the Quad Cities is kind of a gateway to anywhere you need to go — Chicago, Des Moines, St. Louis. It’s kind of centralized to all these fantastic places.

“I also love the program, mostly because of Dr. Pamela J. White, the museum studies director. “She’s been a phenomenal advisor and mentor. I really think it’s because of her that the program is as big as it is.”

What’s After Western?

Cortez is pursuing the degree in museum studies with plans to work in visitor services.

“I’ve loved museums ever since I was a child,” he said. “In Des Moines, there was a state historical society museum downtown, and and I used to beg my mom to take me every week. I love history. I love reading history books, on many topics, including European history, U.S. history, even African history.”

More info:

Also elected:

  • Caroline Sipiera of Galena, IL, senior communication major, as vice president
  • Benjamin Brondos of Brookfield, IL, senior engineering major, as attorney general.
  • (…and a special goodbye to graduating past-president Nicholas “Nico” Moreno

“I’d like to give a shout-out to Nico for running a tight ship, and I’m incredibly thankful for what he did for SGA,” Cortez said.

More information on the WIU-QC SGA

COAP Employee Spotlight: Seth Miner

Western Illinois University Director of Admissions Seth Miner

“No matter how intense meetings can be or the amount of pressure that comes with working in admissions, I have never dreaded going to work. In admissions, we have an opportunity to open the doors to the future for prospective students and feed off the excitement they have in determining the next chapter in their lives.” — Western Illinois University Director of Admissions Seth Miner

One of the better feelings in life is landing a new job or reaching a career milestone in a field that you love. Seth Miner, Western Illinois University’s new director of undergraduate admissions, has accomplished both with his new post at Western.

The director of admissions at any university can be considered the “hotseat,” depending on many internal and external circumstances that impact students’ choices of where to attend college; thus, it is often considered a stressful job. According to Seth, though, sometimes, that pressure can be useful.

No matter how intense meetings can be or the amount of pressure that comes with working in admissions, I have never dreaded going to work. In admissions, we have an opportunity to open the doors to the future for prospective students and feed off the excitement they have in determining the next chapter in their lives. I also love being challenged, which is something that we face on a daily basis in admissions,” he explained.

Seth agreed to share a bit more about himself in the Council of Administrative Personnel (COAP) Spotlight this month. More about his background and his work at Western so far, is below…

Welcome to Western Illinois University, Seth!

Q. Tell me a bit about your background: How did you wind up working at WIU?

Seth: I was one of those students who never wanted to leave college, as I thoroughly enjoyed my college experience. I began my higher education career as the carpenter for Waldorf College in Forest City, IA. I was a proud alumnus who wanted to work at Waldorf and viewed the job as a foot in the door. After six months working at Waldorf College, a position opened in admissions. I applied, was offered, and accepted the position, and it was at that point that I was hooked!

Admissions is all about building relationships with prospective students and families, promoting the great things the institution has to offer—with the intent of the student choosing to enroll. After two years in admissions, I wanted to see what it was like building those relationships with students (once they were at the institution) as a way of retaining them. I then accepted a position at Luther College in Decorah, IA, in residence life.

At Luther College, I was the area coordinator for a complex that housed 750 upper-class students. It was a great experience, but it did not take long for me to realize I missed the fast-paced life of working in admissions. It was at this time that I got back into admissions at Upper Iowa University in Fayette, IA, as the associate director of admissions there.

During my time at Upper Iowa University, I co-supervised professional staff members, managed an in-state, as well as an out-of-state, territory, and also supervised the admissions student ambassador program and student call team. Up to that point, my experience had been working at small private institutions. I began to search for opportunities at small regional public institutions, as I felt I could incorporate my private experience and practices into public institution recruitment and be successful.

The next chapter in my career was at Bemidji State University in Bemidji, MN, as the associate director of admissions and scholarship coordinator. For two years I held that position, and in it, I also supervised  admissions representatives, in addition to coordinating scholarships and implementing the strategic recruitment plan of the admissions office.

My third and final year at Bemidji State University, I had the opportunity to serve as the interim director of admissions, and my additional responsibilities included coordinating community outreach programs, budget management, strategic planning, and supervising the entire admissions staff of nine professional staff members.

I found success in implementing more of a private recruitment strategy at a public institution. My career goals were to work at a larger public institution, and that is when I came across this opportunity at Western Illinois University.

What sparked my initial interest in WIU was the automatic merit-based scholarship program that WIU has. It is reminiscent of what private institutions do and what I was accustomed to in my past experience.

Another draw to WIU was the cost guarantee and no out-of-state tuition. Higher education is a competitive market, and WIU has made these decisions that will ensure that we are providing a quality education at an affordable price.

Q. What does a typical day at work at Western look like for you so far?

Seth: It has been great getting to meet all the people here at WIU and in the city of Macomb in the two months that I have been at WIU. One of the things that I love about working in admissions is that there is no such thing as a typical day. I often look at my calendar the night before to determine what I have going on the next day and that often changes. I rely heavily on my staff, and make it a point to visit with the processing staff right away in the morning, as it is a busy time of the year for them.

The majority of my days are spent in meetings, as well as looking at data to identify trends that we can capitalize on in the recruitment of students.

Q. What are some of the most challenging aspects of your job?

Seth: I am a competitor and enjoy a good challenge. The biggest challenge that we face in admissions is that our livelihood is determined by the decision-making ability of a 17- to 18-year old. We can do everything right in the recruitment process, provide the students all the information he or she needs about the institution and his or her program of interest, mutually determine that WIU is a good fit and what the student is looking for, and yet, he or she can still decide to go elsewhere. There are many outside variables that beyond our immediate control.

Q. Tell me a little about your favorite activities outside of your job.

Seth: I am currently working on my doctorate degree, so my activities have been limited. However, I do have three children (Brooks, who is 10, Cameron, who is 7, and Kaitlyn, who is 1) that I enjoy taking to the park with my wife (Jennifer). Family is a big part of my life, and the move to Macomb has also brought us closer to extended family. Our two boys are at the age where they are becoming more active in extracurricular activities, such as football, soccer, basketball, and baseball and we are excited to get them involved in all the Macomb community has to offer.

Q. What is your go-to advice?

Seth: My go-to advice would have to be to challenge yourself every day and step out of your comfort zone. It is only when you step out of your comfort zone that you truly find what you are capable of and can continually raise the bar! It is something that I have lived my life by, and if I would not have stepped out of my comfort zone and made an 11-hour move, I would not have had the opportunity to meet so many great individuals here in Macomb and at Western Illinois University.

Alum Spearheads Backpacks for Homeless Project in Chicago

On Dec. 26, DeAngelo Gerald, a 2014 graduate of Western Illinois University’s social work program, will distribute backpacks to homeless individuals in Chicago. The packs and the items in them are the fruits of his labor in the “Backpacks for the Homeless – Chicago” project. Currently, DeAngelo has a GoFundMe campaign and a Facebook page to help publicize and support his project, which he started last year.

The day after Santa is officially done this year, Western Illinois University alumnus DeAngelo Gerald will spearhead his own gift-giving operation in a typically cold northern location.

On December 26, DeAngelo — a 2014 WIU social work graduate — will hand out backpacks (filled with hats, gloves, food, toiletry items, and other necessary items) to homeless individuals in Chicago. The items he will distribute are the fruits of his labor for his “Backpacks for the Homeless – Chicago” project. Currently, he has a GoFundMe campaign and a Facebook page to help publicize his project, which he started last year.

This year, DeAngelo — who is pursuing a master’s degree in social work at Aurora University and serving as a social work intern at Metea Valley High School (Aurora, IL) — is receiving help for the project from a few suburban organizations, including Metea Valley High School, Vernon Hills Park District, and the Mundelein/Vernon Hills Rotary Club, too.

DeAngelo recently reached out to his undergraduate alma mater to let us know about the project, and I asked him a few questions about his “Backpacks for the Homeless – Chicago” campaign/project and his service in the social work field.

Q. What have you been doing since you left Western?

DeAngelo: Upon graduating from WIU, I immediately began working in the social services field, primarily working with youth with such barriers as homelessness, disability, high school dropouts, etc. In addition to currently serving in my social work internship at Metea Valley High School, I also serve as the assistant football coach there.

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Items that have been donated or purchased for the “Backpacks for the Homeless – Chicago” project.

Q. Tell me about the “Backpacks for the Homeless” project was started.

DeAngelo: I began the campaign last year. I was able to collect 60 backpacks filled with such items as hats, gloves, jackets, food, water, toothbrushes, feminine products, etc.,  and after all of the backpacks were collected, I, with the help of my family, and friends, walked the streets of downtown Chicago and distributed the backpacks to those in need. We were able to give out all of the backpacks, as well as some gift cards to restaurants.

This year, with the organizations helping us, as well as family and friends, we have been able to collect more than 120 backpacks thus far! Just as we did last year, with the help of friends and family, the backpacks will be hand delivered December 26 to the homeless throughout the Chicagoland area.

Some of the donate items, pictured on the "Backpacks for the Homeless - Chicago" Facebook page December 7, 2016.

Some of the donated items in 2016 (pictured on the “Backpacks for the Homeless – Chicago” Facebook page December 7, 2016). The caption reads: “More donations from the Vernon Hills Park District! Thank you so much for all that you have done this far!!!”

Q. How can people help with the project?

DeAngelo: For individuals looking to donate goods to the cause, they can reach out to me via Facebook , by email, or by phone (call or text), and share with me the items they want to donate. Once I receive their information, I can coordinate a time and place to meet with them in order to pick up the donation.

For individuals looking to donate funds to the cause, go to www.Gofundme.com/Backpacks2016. I encourage anyone who donated funds to GoFund Me to like the “Backpacks for the Homeless” Facebook page, so they may see photos of all of the items that have been purchased with their donations.

For individuals looking to assist with the distribution of the backpacks, they too can contact me via Facebook, email, or by phone (call or text). Once I make contact with them, I provide them with detailed information regarding when and where to meet on the distribution day. Once it gets closer to the distribution day, I will touch base with them in order to confirm that they will be helping to distribute the backpacks.

This year, any backpacks unable to be distributed on December 26, will be donated to Pads of Lake County. I have reached out to them and they are fully aware of the project and look forward to any donations that I am able to provide to them.

To reach DeAngelo, call, text, email, or inbox at:

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Creating Special Moments

Creating Special Moments

Editor’s Note: Western Illinois University Department of Communication Instructor David Zanolla is on sabbatical to broaden his understanding of organizational communication. Zanolla teaches Communication 379, “Disney and Universal Communication Culture,” a course that begins with eight weeks of classroom study about the organizational and communication culture of the Disney parks and culminates in a trip to Walt Disney World so students can observe the Disney communication culture in action.


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Hong Kong Disneyland on Lantau Island

Hong Kong Disneyland was definitely the smallest of the theme parks I visited while in Asia, but that doesn’t mean it didn’t provide a wealth of material to help me better understand the organizational culture of the Disney Parks.

One tenet of the Disney Parks’ culture is the importance of creating special moments for guests. Specifically, they refer to these opportunities as “Magical Moments.” It doesn’t matter how many times I visit a Disney Park, these moments where special attention is paid to me as a guest are always noteworthy.

At this particular park, I was looking forward to visiting Mystic Manor, an attraction that’s at the top of many Disney fans’ bucket lists.  The attraction is very similar to the Haunted Mansion rides in the American parks, but is done using state of the art special effects, including having ride vehicles running without being secured to a track.  Both the outside and inside of this attraction are gorgeous.

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The exterior of Mystic Manor.

While waiting in line to board the ride, a cast member asked my travel partner, Doug, why I was taking so many pictures. He explained the reason for my travels and my anticipation for getting to experience this attraction. She asked our names and then put us into a ride vehicle.

To make a long story short, the ride did not disappoint. The story, music (by film composer Danny Elfman) and ride effects all worked together perfectly.  As we were exiting our ride vehicle, the cast member approached us and handed us a certificate to commemorate our visit and first ride on Mystic Manor. In addition, she asked if we wanted to immediately ride again. We accepted without hesitation and were placed back in a vehicle without having to leave the building and come back through the main entrance.

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This free certificate is now in my office..

However, our positive experience with Mystic Point (the land where the ride was located) didn’t end there.  Doug and I decided to grab lunch at the fast food neighboring restaurant called “The Explorer’s Club.”

 

We had a fabulous lunch and, once again, I took a large amount of pictures of the interior of the restaurant. An assistant manager img_9539by the name of Simon came over and asked why I was taking so many photos (by now I should have just handed them a card).

After he talked with us about our travels for a few minutes, he asked if we’d be in the park the next day. When we told him that yes, we would be back, he asked if we wanted to come back for lunch. Having loved our meal, we immediately said that we’d love to come back.

Simon then said, “It’s going to be very busy tomorrow, so come back at 12:30, and I’ll have a table reserved for you.”  img_9492

Again, I must stress that I realize this gesture was nothing fancy, but being foreigners studying the culture of the international Disney parks, it was a perfect offer.

The next day, we returned to the restaurant at 12:30 and Simon was waiting for us. He brought us to the front to order and then to our table. He chatted with us again for a few moments and thanked us numerous times for coming back to the restaurant. As we were getting up to leave after finishing our meals, he asked if we would wait a minute before leaving.  Soon after, he came out with another manager and presented us with a complimentary dessert.

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We then asked if we could take a picture with him and the cast member that decorated our plate, and they were happy to oblige.

Why do I tell this story? Nothing overly grand took place. The dessert was simple and the gesture was even more so.

That said, it made us feel comfortable and special in a park in a country that was obviously not home.

img_9382Are there any opportunities for your organization to enact the principle of creating special moments for your employees or customers?

Obviously, providing free dessert may not always be fitting in your organization, but how can it be done where you work?

It didn’t take Simon and his crew very much time or money to make us feel special, but the fact that I’m writing about it once I returned home means it had the desired impact.


My Disney & Universal Communication Culture course (COMM 379) will be offered during the Spring 2017 semester.  For more information, visit the course webpage.

COAP Employee Spotlight: Dana Vizdal, WIU Center for International Studies

Dana Vizdal (second from left) and international students at the 2016 International Bazaar at WIU

Dana Vizdal (second from left) and international students at the 2016 International Bazaar at WIU

Traveling to and staying in a foreign country can be one of the most exhilarating experiences you can have. It can also be one of the most daunting, particularly if you’re a young college student.

Luckily, at Western Illinois University, international students have a well-developed support system that is the team of committed individuals who work in WIU’s Center for International Studies (CIS).

And although it’s not quite yet time for International Education Week (that occurs in November, and is set from Nov. 14-18 this year), it’s never too early to recognize the work that international educators do. Over the years, I have had the pleasure of collaborating with a few of the staff members at the CIS. I quickly picked up on the fact that they take their jobs—working with the many international students who come to Western—very seriously.

One of those dedicated staff members is CIS Assistant Director Dana Vizdal, who once was an international student herself during a semester-long study abroad program in Europe. So with International Education Week just around the corner, and to recognize Western’s commitment to international studies for both American and international students, this month, for the the Council of Administrative Personnel (COAP) Spotlight, we’re featuring Dana.

Below, she talks a bit about her background and what she does here for the many individuals who travel tens of thousands of miles to come and study in Macomb at WIU.

Q. How did you end up working at Western?

Dana: I actually grew up in Macomb and earned both of my degrees from WIU. I was fortunate to study abroad in Spain for a semester, which really got me interested in international affairs. I have had the opportunity to work at WIU as a student worker, a graduate assistant, a civil service employee and now as an administrator in my current position.

Dana Vizdal and Western Illinois Univeristy international students visiting the Illinois State Capitol Building in Springfield.

Dana Vizdal and Western Illinois University and a group of international students visiting the Illinois State Capitol Building in Springfield.

Q. What does a typical day at work at Western look like for you?

Dana: There really isn’t a typical day for me. I work closely with my graduate assistants, collaborate with many offices across campus, and help students with any questions or issues. It’s important to me that the international students know there is someone advocating for them and someone they can always approach. My door is always open, and if it’s not, there is a note on my door saying when I’ll be back.

Q. What is your favorite on-the-job memory?

Dana: I love following our students on Facebook and witnessing them experience real American culture. Seeing their reactions to and pictures of their first autumn experiences or snowfall in the Midwest is priceless.

Q. What has been your most rewarding professional experience in your career at WIU so far?

Dana: One of the most rewarding experiences was learning that a student decided to attend WIU because I spoke with his sibling at a recruitment fair abroad!

Q. What are your favorite activities outside of your job?

Dana: When I’m not working, I love traveling, eating good food, and spending time with my boyfriend, family, and friends.

Q. What is your favorite quote or quotes?

Dana: I really like “It is not our differences that divide us. It is our inability to recognize, accept, and celebrate those differences,” by Audre Lorde, as well as “Alone we can do so little, together we can do so much,” by Helen Keller.

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Follow Western’s Center for International Studies on Facebook at www.facebook.com/WIUCenterforInternationalStudies/.