Recent grads on their ‘chain’ of successful events

What can a degree from WIU do for you?

For two students who came back to campus recently at WIU-QC, the answer is: find a solid career with one of the world’s most well-known corporations.

WIU-Quad Cities faculty and community leaders welcomed recent grads Jennifer Gibson (left) and Kim Goodwin (right) back to campus recently, where they reunited with their professor, James (a.k.a. “Jim”) Patterson, who serves as assistant dean/associate professor of the QC supply chain management — and was a warehouse supervisor before earning his Ph.D. and entering academia.

 

photo of professor Jim Patterson and students

Recent WIU-QC grads reunite with their professor, Jim Patterson, in Riverfront Hall

Gibson, who graduated with a bachelor’s degree, and Goodwin, who earned her MBA, both focusing on supply chain management, credited their coursework in areas such as warehouse management; and having required internships, for helping them secure employment as product buyers for John Deere Davenports Works. (The John Deere World Headquarters is based in nearby Moline, Illinois, where WIU-QC is located.)

“Those courses, and having professors who have had real-world experience in the industry, really prepared us,” she said. She also credited the opportunity to participate in a case competition, competing with students from other universities to solve an industry problem. “Things like that really help you develop the critical-thinking and decision- making that you use every day on the job.”

Gibson and Goodwin were invited back to campus recently for a Planning and Advisory Committee meeting, to detail ways that their degrees from WIU-QC, their internship experiences, and their real-world learning experiences in the program prepared them for their positions.

Alum Spearheads Backpacks for Homeless Project in Chicago

On Dec. 26, DeAngelo Gerald, a 2014 graduate of Western Illinois University’s social work program, will distribute backpacks to homeless individuals in Chicago. The packs and the items in them are the fruits of his labor in the “Backpacks for the Homeless – Chicago” project. Currently, DeAngelo has a GoFundMe campaign and a Facebook page to help publicize and support his project, which he started last year.

The day after Santa is officially done this year, Western Illinois University alumnus DeAngelo Gerald will spearhead his own gift-giving operation in a typically cold northern location.

On December 26, DeAngelo — a 2014 WIU social work graduate — will hand out backpacks (filled with hats, gloves, food, toiletry items, and other necessary items) to homeless individuals in Chicago. The items he will distribute are the fruits of his labor for his “Backpacks for the Homeless – Chicago” project. Currently, he has a GoFundMe campaign and a Facebook page to help publicize his project, which he started last year.

This year, DeAngelo — who is pursuing a master’s degree in social work at Aurora University and serving as a social work intern at Metea Valley High School (Aurora, IL) — is receiving help for the project from a few suburban organizations, including Metea Valley High School, Vernon Hills Park District, and the Mundelein/Vernon Hills Rotary Club, too.

DeAngelo recently reached out to his undergraduate alma mater to let us know about the project, and I asked him a few questions about his “Backpacks for the Homeless – Chicago” campaign/project and his service in the social work field.

Q. What have you been doing since you left Western?

DeAngelo: Upon graduating from WIU, I immediately began working in the social services field, primarily working with youth with such barriers as homelessness, disability, high school dropouts, etc. In addition to currently serving in my social work internship at Metea Valley High School, I also serve as the assistant football coach there.

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Items that have been donated or purchased for the “Backpacks for the Homeless – Chicago” project.

Q. Tell me about the “Backpacks for the Homeless” project was started.

DeAngelo: I began the campaign last year. I was able to collect 60 backpacks filled with such items as hats, gloves, jackets, food, water, toothbrushes, feminine products, etc.,  and after all of the backpacks were collected, I, with the help of my family, and friends, walked the streets of downtown Chicago and distributed the backpacks to those in need. We were able to give out all of the backpacks, as well as some gift cards to restaurants.

This year, with the organizations helping us, as well as family and friends, we have been able to collect more than 120 backpacks thus far! Just as we did last year, with the help of friends and family, the backpacks will be hand delivered December 26 to the homeless throughout the Chicagoland area.

Some of the donate items, pictured on the "Backpacks for the Homeless - Chicago" Facebook page December 7, 2016.

Some of the donated items in 2016 (pictured on the “Backpacks for the Homeless – Chicago” Facebook page December 7, 2016). The caption reads: “More donations from the Vernon Hills Park District! Thank you so much for all that you have done this far!!!”

Q. How can people help with the project?

DeAngelo: For individuals looking to donate goods to the cause, they can reach out to me via Facebook , by email, or by phone (call or text), and share with me the items they want to donate. Once I receive their information, I can coordinate a time and place to meet with them in order to pick up the donation.

For individuals looking to donate funds to the cause, go to www.Gofundme.com/Backpacks2016. I encourage anyone who donated funds to GoFund Me to like the “Backpacks for the Homeless” Facebook page, so they may see photos of all of the items that have been purchased with their donations.

For individuals looking to assist with the distribution of the backpacks, they too can contact me via Facebook, email, or by phone (call or text). Once I make contact with them, I provide them with detailed information regarding when and where to meet on the distribution day. Once it gets closer to the distribution day, I will touch base with them in order to confirm that they will be helping to distribute the backpacks.

This year, any backpacks unable to be distributed on December 26, will be donated to Pads of Lake County. I have reached out to them and they are fully aware of the project and look forward to any donations that I am able to provide to them.

To reach DeAngelo, call, text, email, or inbox at:

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COAP Employee Spotlight: Dana Vizdal, WIU Center for International Studies

Dana Vizdal (second from left) and international students at the 2016 International Bazaar at WIU

Dana Vizdal (second from left) and international students at the 2016 International Bazaar at WIU

Traveling to and staying in a foreign country can be one of the most exhilarating experiences you can have. It can also be one of the most daunting, particularly if you’re a young college student.

Luckily, at Western Illinois University, international students have a well-developed support system that is the team of committed individuals who work in WIU’s Center for International Studies (CIS).

And although it’s not quite yet time for International Education Week (that occurs in November, and is set from Nov. 14-18 this year), it’s never too early to recognize the work that international educators do. Over the years, I have had the pleasure of collaborating with a few of the staff members at the CIS. I quickly picked up on the fact that they take their jobs—working with the many international students who come to Western—very seriously.

One of those dedicated staff members is CIS Assistant Director Dana Vizdal, who once was an international student herself during a semester-long study abroad program in Europe. So with International Education Week just around the corner, and to recognize Western’s commitment to international studies for both American and international students, this month, for the the Council of Administrative Personnel (COAP) Spotlight, we’re featuring Dana.

Below, she talks a bit about her background and what she does here for the many individuals who travel tens of thousands of miles to come and study in Macomb at WIU.

Q. How did you end up working at Western?

Dana: I actually grew up in Macomb and earned both of my degrees from WIU. I was fortunate to study abroad in Spain for a semester, which really got me interested in international affairs. I have had the opportunity to work at WIU as a student worker, a graduate assistant, a civil service employee and now as an administrator in my current position.

Dana Vizdal and Western Illinois Univeristy international students visiting the Illinois State Capitol Building in Springfield.

Dana Vizdal and Western Illinois University and a group of international students visiting the Illinois State Capitol Building in Springfield.

Q. What does a typical day at work at Western look like for you?

Dana: There really isn’t a typical day for me. I work closely with my graduate assistants, collaborate with many offices across campus, and help students with any questions or issues. It’s important to me that the international students know there is someone advocating for them and someone they can always approach. My door is always open, and if it’s not, there is a note on my door saying when I’ll be back.

Q. What is your favorite on-the-job memory?

Dana: I love following our students on Facebook and witnessing them experience real American culture. Seeing their reactions to and pictures of their first autumn experiences or snowfall in the Midwest is priceless.

Q. What has been your most rewarding professional experience in your career at WIU so far?

Dana: One of the most rewarding experiences was learning that a student decided to attend WIU because I spoke with his sibling at a recruitment fair abroad!

Q. What are your favorite activities outside of your job?

Dana: When I’m not working, I love traveling, eating good food, and spending time with my boyfriend, family, and friends.

Q. What is your favorite quote or quotes?

Dana: I really like “It is not our differences that divide us. It is our inability to recognize, accept, and celebrate those differences,” by Audre Lorde, as well as “Alone we can do so little, together we can do so much,” by Helen Keller.

•••

Follow Western’s Center for International Studies on Facebook at www.facebook.com/WIUCenterforInternationalStudies/.

It’s All About the Students… COAP Employee Spotlight: Tracy Scott

Editor’s Note: After a bit of hiatus, the Council of Administrative Personnel Employee Spotlight is back. This month features Tracy Scott, who was named the COAP Employee of the Year (EOY) in 2016 and was recognized at last week’s (along with other award-winning employees) 23rd annual Founders’ Day celebration at Western Illinois University.

Right before the semester got underway this fall, Tracy Scott, the director of Western Illinois University’s Student Development Office (SDO), posted this to his Facebook profile:

Tracy Scott Facebook Post: "Seeing returning students who see each other for the first time since last semester never gets old! Love the hugs and the squeals!"While he’s been at WIU for nearly 30 years, it’s clear he still loves what he does at Western—most of which involves working with students. In his answers below, he explains his history with one of his alma maters and demonstrates why he was nominated for and ultimately chosen as COAP EOY.

Tracy Scott: WIU COAP Employee of the Year

Tracy Scott (center), director of the Western Illinois University Student Development Office, was named the WIU 2016 Employee of the Year by the Council of Administrative Personnel (COAP). He is pictured here with his two nominators, Vian Neally, assistant director of marketing at Campus Recreation, and Associate Vice President for Student Services John “JB” Biernbaum.

Q: Tell me a bit about your background: When did you start at WIU? What kinds of roles have you served in since you’ve been employed at Western?

Tracy: I first came to WIU in the fall of 1988 as a graduate student in the public communication program. I had an assistantship and primarily assisted with the Communication “Public Speaking” 241 course. For my thesis project, I worked on developing a brochure on cultural diversity to enhance the undergraduate admissions marketing plan. I also took graduate electives in WIU’s college student personnel program.

One of my favorite memories during this time was having then WIU President Ralph Wagoner co- teaching one of my courses. After receiving my master’s degree from WIU, I was hired by the Admissions Office as an admissions counselor.

Later, I was promoted to the assistant director of Admissions, where I was responsible for the reception center. After that, I was selected as the assistant director for the Student Development and Orientation Office (SDO) and then became the director of SDO in 2001. I also supervise the LGBT*QA Resource Center and serve as the Emergency Consultation team chair and co-chair of the Threat Assessment Team.

Q: On any given day, what kinds of tasks/duties do you undertake at WIU?

Tracy: One of the things I love most about my job is that every day is different. My day typically consists of assisting students in some form of crisis and helping them through that crisis. I also love the daily interaction of working with graduate students who are preparing for a career in higher education.

Q: What are some of the best parts of your job? What are some of the most challenging parts of your job?

Tracy: The best parts of my job is advocating for students and empowering students to take control of their challenges and watching them grow. Some of the most challenging parts of the job include working with situations of suicide, sexual assault, and other psychological situations that arise. It is also very challenging to work with students who have limited support.

Who We Are, What We Do: Piletic & Janisz

Tracy Scott came up with the idea of the “Who We Are, What We Do” series of posts about Western Illinois University employees. This installment featured Cindy Piletic and Michelle Janisz.

Q: Tell me about the “Who We Are, What We Do” campaign. How did this idea come about for you? Why do you think it’s important?

Tracy: I had the privilege of serving on the President’s Staff Roundtable this past year, and during one of our meetings we were discussing ways to counter all the negativity surrounding the state budget crisis. My idea was to highlight many of the positive things/people that we have in this community. I thought about how successful the ALS Facebook challenge was and thought could we do something similar where those with connections to WIU could share their stories and create interest while promoting positive stories during such a difficult time. I think it’s important because we have many, many success stories, and even in difficult times we have good things to be thankful for.

Leathernecks lapel pin

How do I stay on track to get good grades? What are my responsibilities as a student? How can I get involved on campus? These are common questions often asked by new college students, and a Western Illinois University committee, comprised of student services staff, came up with a “one stop shop,” so to speak, that provides direction and guidance to incoming students. The new site, wiu.edu/welcome, answers these questions and much more, and all new students were given a Leathernecks lapel pin, complete with the website on the pin’s card.

Q: Recently, you were part of the team who implemented a “Leatherneck Pin” and website resource project designed to support new students at Western: Tell me about how this project came about and why you think it’s important to provide resources like this for new students.

Tracy: Over the past several years, there have been several of us in student services who have come together in a collaborative effort to get important information to our students. We moved to creating one publication, the Student Planner/Handbook; however, due to the budget situation this year, we wanted to save money but still find a way to get the information out to new students. As a result of this, an online “Welcome” page was developed. As we were having discussions on how to inform students about this page, the idea of a Leatherneck Pin was mentioned. It is a way to have new students take pride in being a Leatherneck and share the message of what it means to be a Leatherneck, as well as provides a way to drive students to the Welcome page.

These things are important because we want our students to be proud to be here and to be a member of this community and we want them to have the information they need to be successful.

Q: What do you enjoy while you’re away from work?

Tracy: There are many things I like to do in my time away from work. I enjoy getting together with friends/family, having dinner, a game night or listening to live music. I also enjoy golfing with my dad and my favorite thing to do is spend time with my son, Tanner.

Q: Do you have any go-to advice for those who work with college students?

Tracy: Embrace each moment. We are very fortunate that we get to work with college students each and every day. We have the opportunity to have a positive impact on their development and in return they have a positive impact in our development, as well.

Success by Design: Internship Adds to Graphic Communication Repertoire for New WIU Alumna

Mariah Bartz, a brand new alumna of Western Illinois University, with the Pokémon Go map she designed for WIU's Macomb campus.

Mariah Bartz, a brand new alumna of Western Illinois University, with the Pokémon Go map she designed for WIU’s Macomb campus.

What experiences in an internship can help make it “awesome” for a college student?

Just ask Macomb native and brand new Western Illinois University alumna Mariah Bartz. This summer, those of us who work in University Relations had the great pleasure of working with Mariah—she has been in our office every morning since May 24 working to complete a design internship, the final requirement for her bachelor’s degree in graphic communication.

“Working with University Relations allowed me to utilize my skills in a real-world setting. I had to apply many things I had learned in my courses, and this served as both continued practice and as a reminder for the tips and tricks I needed to make something look the way I imagined it to be,” Mariah noted. “During this internship, I designed posters, postcards, birthday cards, advertisements, booklet pages, maps, and a social media directory webpage and a blog directory webpage for Western’s website. I was fortunate to be given such a wide variety of projects during my time there, and it was particularly awesome to get to work both with page layout and web design.”

Throughout much of her time at Western, Mariah has truly embraced the University’s core values of educational opportunity and personal growth and has the projects/creations now under her belt to prove it. Not only has she created a number of real-world projects this summer we’re using in University Relations—e.g., the Pokémon Go map for campus and she completed a much-needed update to our social media directory—but she also has been doing so since at least 2015 as a Western student.

Mariah with the Rocky statue she was selected to paint the 2015 edition of the Rocky on Parade campaign.

Mariah with the Rocky statue she was selected to paint the 2015 edition of the Rocky on Parade campaign.

In the fall last year, Mariah was selected to design the 2015 holiday card, which features an original watercolor lithograph of Sherman Hall. The card was sent to more than 750 friends of the WIU Foundation. Also in 2015, Mariah was chosen to design and paint the Foundation’s Rocky statue as a part of the 2015 Rocky on Parade campaign. Bartz’s “Molecule Dog,” featuring the chemical symbols for love and happiness, is now situated by the flagpole north of the University Union.

Mariah, who has also had her artwork featured at the Juried Student Exhibition at WIU, the Evanston Art Center (Evanston, IL), and the Figge Art Museum (Davenport, IA), shared a bit more about her background and her experiences at Western below…

Q. Where did you grow up? What are your interests outside of work/school?

Mariah: I grew up here in Macomb, so WIU has been a part of my life for a long time. Outside of work or school, my interests include doing small art projects, playing video games, and watching movies. I am very much a homebody.

Q. What have been some of your most memorable experiences as a student at WIU?

Rocky on Parade statue painted by WIU alumna Mariah Bartz (pictured here with Mariah's aunt, grandmother, and mother) on the north side of the Western Illinois University Union.

The 2015 Rocky on Parade statue painted by WIU alumna Mariah Bartz (pictured here with Mariah’s aunt, grandmother, and mother). The statue is located on the north side of the Western Illinois University Union.

Mariah: The most memorable experience was getting drafted by the WIU Foundation to paint their Rocky sculpture for Rocky on Parade in 2015. It was fun for me to paint it, and now that my “molecule dog” is under the flag post by the Union, it’s fun to see people interact with the dog and take photos of it.

Q. What are your career plans?

Mariah: For the future, I plan to move into a city to get a broader use for my degree, with either printed media or web design. I may also consider continuing my education—if I later feel that it would be a good direction for me to go.

Q. How do you think your studies have prepared you for your career?

Mariah: I feel like many of the courses I took benefitted me greatly, and I had some excellent instruction from a few teachers along the way. There are some good habits I have formed through my advanced design classes that have made me prepared to handle a variety of professional circumstances.

Q. What advice do you have for current and future WIU students?

Mariah: Between my sophomore and junior year, I ended up taking some time off from school. For me, this was a benefit, because I needed to sort of recharge my batteries. When I returned to WIU, I was more motivated and dedicated, and it absolutely paid off then.

If you are a student who feels stressed or pressured, please understand that everyone’s life is different, and that if you want to progress somewhere, you can do so when the time is right for you.

•••••••••

Although we’re proud that Mariah seemed to enjoy and benefit immensely her time with us here in University Relations this summer, we’re even more proud that she chose Western and she will go forth and represent her alma mater well… yet another WIU Success Story!

COAP Employee Spotlight: Judy Yeast

Courtney James and Judy Yeast

According to Western Illinois University alumna Courtney James (left), who worked with Judy Yeast (right) on Big Pink Volleyball (BPV), WIU’s annual breast cancer fundraising volleyball tourney, Judy had a significant impact on her while she was a graduate student working on the BPV student organization team.

“You’re going to be doing the Fallen Soldier 5K, right, Teresa?”

The voice was coming from above me just as I was about to begin an early morning workout in September. I stopped, a couple of steps up from the landing, on my way to the upper level at the Donald S. Spencer Student Recreation Center, tilted my eyes toward the ceiling and saw Judy Yeast, associate director of Western Illinois University’s Campus Recreation. She was smiling down at me over the stairwell railing.

“I don’t really have the knees anymore for running, Judy.”

“You don’t have to run in it, Teresa. You can walk in it, too,” she said. By that point, she was beaming down at me.

While I personally usually try to stay away from distance walking and running events (which aggravate my unfortunate genetically determined arthritic knee condition), a few weeks later, I found myself walking in Western’s Fallen Soldiers 5K Run/Walk.

After the event, I can honestly say I was glad I did it—and I plan to “do” the Fallen Solider 5K Run/Walk again next year, aching knees and all.

The 2015 Fallen Soldiers 5K Run/Walk at WIU

The 2015 Fallen Soldiers 5K Run/Walk at WIU. See more photos of the annual event at bit.ly/WIUFS5K.

Judy has been an integral part of such WIU philanthropic events as the Fallen Soldiers 5K, which is a fundraiser for the Fallen Soldiers’ Scholarship Fund in honor of WIU alumni Capt. Derek Dobogai and Lt. Col. Robert Baldwin, who were killed in the line of duty, as well as the annual University Housing (Thompson Hall) and Campus Recreation breast cancer fundraising Big Pink Volleyball Tournament. The single-elimination Big Pink Volleyball tourney — which began at Western in 2002 and has spread to many campuses and even private-sector companies since — has raised nearly $120,000 at WIU alone to support the breast cancer cause.

Members of the Big Pink Volleyball Committee in 2015.

It was Judy Yeast (back row, left, wearing pink scarf) who first purchased a “big pink volleyball” for use at WIU’s Student Recreation Center. In 15 years, Big Pink Volleyball at WIU has raised $118,457. Of that, Susan G. Komen for the Cure has received $56,905.28 and McDonough District Hospital has received $61,550.84. Of the 70 percent donated to MDH, 35 percent is donated to Linda’s Fund and the other 35 percent is donated to Outreach Services.

“It started because of Judy,” noted WIU alumna Joni Burch (2004), who was part of the very first group of Thompson Hall resident assistants, or the “founding mothers,” involved with Big Pink Volleyball at Western. “When it began at WIU, Judy just had bought this big pink ball for the Student Recreation Center. During our winter training as resident assistants, we were having a social event, and she came up to me and said, ‘You should think of a program to use this ball,'” Burch explained. “We were having a lot of fun playing volleyball with the big pink ball, so, based on Judy’s suggestion, that’s what we decided we would do. Our first tourney was in April that year. We decided we liked it so much, we would hold it in October, too, and make it an annual thing in October for breast cancer awareness,” Burch added.

Although I have only known her since about 2008 (the year I began working at WIU), Judy has truly been an inspiration to me personally. I have had the fortunate circumstance to work with her, as well as run into her, many times on campus over the years. Each time, I can honestly say, I have come away with a positive sentiment or feeling to take me through the rest of the day.

After her 34 years at Western, I can imagine there are many, many people — students, faculty, staff, alumni — who have come into contact with Judy who have similar stories, anecdotes that included them taking part in, or implementing, an activity or idea she suggested.

“I always try to have people see the positive side of things and to stay positive and encourage people to invest in themselves,” she told me, when I recently asked her if she would be interested in being featured as the subject of the Nov./Dec. 2015 “Council of Administrative Personnel (COAP) Employee Spotlight,” a blog post the COAP Executive Committee sponsors every month or so.

Recently, I learned Judy has decided to retire, and to honor her dedicated service to Western, there is a reception in her honor from 2-4 p.m. this Thursday (Dec. 17) at the WIU Multicultural Center.

I hope this particular spotlight Q&A post also helps to honor her and her commitment to Western. Below are her answers to some questions I posed to her about her long-held position in WIU’s Campus Recreation.

Q. How did you end up working at Western?

Judy: I did my undergraduate degree at Quincy College (now University) in physical education, grades 6-12. Then I did my student teaching, and I decided I did not want to teach high school students, so I came to Western and got a graduate assistantship in women’s intramurals, and I thought, “This is really fun.” After I graduated, I obtained a teaching position at Monmouth College in their physical education program, and a year later, the position here for the Women’s Intramurals director opened up, and I came back to Western. That’s how I got back here, and I’ve been here since 1981.

Q. What was your graduate degree in?

Judy: My master’s degree was in athletic administration (but now it’s called “sport management“). I came into Western as the director of Women’s Intramurals, and that year, WIU renamed and combined men’s and women’s intramurals into Campus Recreation, and John Colgate became the director of campus recreation. I was assistant director of Campus Recreation, then I moved up to associate director. Then, in 1994-95, when we passed the student referendum for the Student Recreation Center, I served as the interim director for Campus Recreation for a time.

That’s probably the highlight of my career here—to see the passing of the student referendum so that we could build the Student Recreation Center.

Q. What did you use for recreational sports here at WIU before the Student Recreation Center was constructed?

Judy: We had the Brophy Hall gym from 6-10 p.m., and we used Brophy’s room 235 for a fitness studio. Whenever Athletics wasn’t using Western Hall, we would get to use Western Hall from 6-10 at night. We had pools in both spaces, but we only had room 235 for our aerobics classes. We might have two or three aerobics classes per day. Now, we have 49 classes throughout the week, and we have a pool that is open during prime times for students in the Recreation Center.

Q. What does a typical day look like for you these days?

Judy: I don’t have a typical day. Like today, I started off with a blood pressure screening and bone density screening for one of the Employee Wellness Committee’s programs. I’m one of 11 people on that committee. After I get done talking with you this morning, I will go and speak to group of graduate assistants to show them how to write their annual reports for the vice president’s office. This afternoon, I’ll be doing a wrap up meeting with the members of the Big Pink Volleyball committee, and tonight, I’ll go over and visit the art department for their program from 7-9 p.m. There are no typical days in Campus Recreation. But, as you know, working with college students keeps you young. And that is the neat thing about our program and my job—that I get to work with students.

Q. What are some of the best aspects of your job?

Judy: I work with a lot of graduate students, and I love it when I see their individual “light bulbs” go on and I know they have passion that you have to have for the field of recreational sports. Watching them get their first jobs and being successful… and then watching them get those second jobs, and then seeing them move into positions they never thought they were capable of and then being able to tell people, “I got my degree here at Western Illinois University.” That is so rewarding for me.

In general, I love the fact I get to work with lots of students. With Big Pink Volleyball, I get to work with the students in Thompson Hall, because Big Pink is their capstone philanthropic project. Also, I work with students who work on Dodgeball for Diabetes, which is co-sponsored with the National Residence Hall Honorary (NRHH) on our WIU campus.

I have been able to work on a lot of different activities. It has been neat to see the success of the Fallen Soldier’s 5K, which began as a midnight basketball tournament in February 2012 that made $28.03. Who would have ever thought we would have endowed the Fallen Soldiers’ Scholarship Fund only a few years later?

Q. What are some of the most challenging aspects of your job?

Judy: I think that are only 24 hours in a day. Just like everybody else, I need my down time and need to follow the wellness models. I need to work out, I need to take care of myself, I need to eat right and have a balance of work and play in my life.

Q. What do you like to do outside of your job?

Judy: We have three children, and our first grandson lives in Denver, so we enjoy traveling. I also enjoy finishing furniture and woodworking, gardening, and doing athletic type of things to stay active.

Q. Do you have a favorite quote or some go-to advice you like or you like to tell people?

Judy: “If exercise could be packed into a pill, it would be the single most widely prescribed and beneficial medicine in the nation.” — Robert Butler

October COAP Employee Spotlight: Joe Roselieb

Joe Roselieb and Col. Rock III

Joe Roselieb and Col. Rock III

The Western Illinois University Council of Administrative Personnel (COAP) employee featured in this month’s COAP Spotlight is usually the individual at the other end of Col. Rock III “Rocky‘s” leash…

In his day job, Joe Roselieb serves as the director of residential facilities for University Housing and Dining Services (UHDS). But at night—and at Western Illinois Athletics‘ games, and in parades, and at WIU AdmissionsDiscover Western open house events, and at many, many student activities, and at alumni events—his main job is to serve as Rocky’s person.

Rocky joined the WIU family in May 2010 as a 10-week-old pup. Since then, Joe has been providing him with a loving home, teaching him tricks, making sure he’s healthy and chauffeuring him to numerous WIU and community events each year.

“It’s been a terrific experience taking care of WIU’s mascot,” Joe noted. “My day-to-day job isn’t always that glamorous, so it’s a real treat to get to be able to take Rocky around and see the positive impact around both the campus and community.”

Joe took time out his (and Rocky’s) busy schedule to provide a little bit of background about himself and he how strives for “paw”fection in his role at UHDS.

Q. Tell me a bit about your background. How did you end up working at Western Illinois University?

Joe and Rocky take a rest at the 2015 WIU Homecoming Leatherneck Football Game.

Joe and Rocky take a rest at the 2014 WIU Homecoming Leatherneck Football Game.

Joe: I’m originally from Prophetstown (IL). I came to WIU in 2003 to attend for my undergraduate degree and graduated in 2007 with my bachelor’s degree. All through college I worked in UHDS as a student worker and was offered an assistantship in housing following graduation, which I accepted and did for one year. In 2008, I had the rare opportunity to apply for an assistant director position for facilities and was selected, and I started my full-time career that July. I finished my master’s later that spring in 2009. In 2012, I was promoted to director of residential facilities.

Q. What does a typical day at work at Western look like for you?

Joe: Every day is a little different and that is what makes it exciting. Most days start at 8 a.m. or a little before and are filled with meetings, walk-throughs of facilities, and a lot of planning. In my area, looking forward is essential, so I spend a lot of time working with members of Facilities Management, University Technology, and other campus entities mapping out things for the future.

Q. What is your favorite on-the-job memory?

Joe: My favorite job memory is probably finishing up renovation Corbin and Olson after three years of planning and construction. It taught me a lot about construction, communication, and just the overall process. When you have a project that big, there is a lot to keep track of and it was a great feeling when it was all done and completed.

Rocky and His Person, Joe Roselieb, in 2010

Rocky and His Person, Joe Roselieb, in 2010

Q. What has been your most rewarding professional experience in your career so far?

Joe: My most rewarding professional experience has been being selected as the 2011 Administrator of the Year from Western’s Division of Student Services.

Q. How do you juggle Rocky’s busy appearance schedule?

Joe: It can be very difficult at times, but we try to attend as much as possible. I’m pretty selective of the events we choose to attend, and I always make sure it coincides with the mission and values of the institution. Looking back at the last five years of the live-mascot program, it has been a gratifying experience to see how far it’s come and the amount of people it has impacted.

Q. Tell me a little about your favorite activities outside of your job (e.g., hobbies, family or friend activities, etc.).

Joe: I enjoy music and sports. I try to attend at least one or two Chicago Bears’ games a year, even though this year I think I’ll save my money. I also purchased a new house last March and work on it when I can. I also became an uncle for the first time on Sept. 28… to a niece.

Q. What is your favorite quote?

Joe: “Don’t let your failures define you, let them refine you.”