Recent grads on their ‘chain’ of successful events

What can a degree from WIU do for you?

For two students who came back to campus recently at WIU-QC, the answer is: find a solid career with one of the world’s most well-known corporations.

WIU-Quad Cities faculty and community leaders welcomed recent grads Jennifer Gibson (left) and Kim Goodwin (right) back to campus recently, where they reunited with their professor, James (a.k.a. “Jim”) Patterson, who serves as assistant dean/associate professor of the QC supply chain management — and was a warehouse supervisor before earning his Ph.D. and entering academia.

 

photo of professor Jim Patterson and students

Recent WIU-QC grads reunite with their professor, Jim Patterson, in Riverfront Hall

Gibson, who graduated with a bachelor’s degree, and Goodwin, who earned her MBA, both focusing on supply chain management, credited their coursework in areas such as warehouse management; and having required internships, for helping them secure employment as product buyers for John Deere Davenports Works. (The John Deere World Headquarters is based in nearby Moline, Illinois, where WIU-QC is located.)

“Those courses, and having professors who have had real-world experience in the industry, really prepared us,” she said. She also credited the opportunity to participate in a case competition, competing with students from other universities to solve an industry problem. “Things like that really help you develop the critical-thinking and decision- making that you use every day on the job.”

Gibson and Goodwin were invited back to campus recently for a Planning and Advisory Committee meeting, to detail ways that their degrees from WIU-QC, their internship experiences, and their real-world learning experiences in the program prepared them for their positions.

Learning from the Past

imageAs I enter this, my 12th year as a faculty member in the Western Illinois University Department of Communication, I am taking a sabbatical (technically called administrative leave) to broaden my understanding of organizational communication.  In addition to teaching a course in Organizational Communication, I also teach a special topics class about the communication culture of the Walt Disney theme parks.  This class, Communication 379, was born here at Western.  The class is only offered at this institution and offers students the opportunity to not only learn about the organizational communication of the Disney parks, but also allows them to immerse themselves in the world of those parks through a week-long visit at the end of the course.

My three-week journey to six Disney theme parks in four countries (the United States, China, Hong Kong and Japan), begins at Disneyland in Anaheim, California. Disneyland opened over 60 years ago in July of 1955 and was Walt Disney’s first theme park. As a result, the park is nearing the end of its ‘diamond’ celebration event. There are images of diamonds everywhere and homages to the history of this ground-breaking park at every turn. Even after 60+ years, this park and its employees (Disney calls them cast members) don’t want you to forget where it all started.

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I think that’s an important lesson for us to remember whether we work in academia or elsewhere. The history of your organization is important, not only to see the successes, but also to learn from the mistakes. Since none of us have a DeLorean that can travel back in time (as far as I know), our way to learn from those that came before us is by learning the history of our organizations. It may not involve a massive year-long celebration complete with nightly fireworks like Disneyland, but the past is important, nonetheless. I believe each organization has its own unique way of life (often referred to as its culture) and, like a family, there are stories to be told about that life and its growth. As I learn about the culture of the Disney Parks, I hope you’ll find some time to learn about the history of your organization as well.

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WIU Alum’s Cubs Victory Song Makes Final 4 Cut in Tribune Contest

Joey White - WIU Baseball 2013

Western Illinois University alumnus and former WIU Baseball student athlete Joey White knows which song he’d like tried-and-true Cubs fans to sing. The song, “Raise the W,” composed by White and his brother, Jimmy, might just have a shot at being the one.

“What should we sing after a Cubs win?” asks Mark Caro in a March 23 Chicago Tribune article, “Go song go: Final four voting for the next Cubs hit.”

Western Illinois University alumnus and former WIU Baseball student athlete Joey White knows which song he’d like tried-and-true Cubs fans to sing. The song, “Raise the W,” composed by White and his brother, Jimmy, might just have a shot at being the one.

The White brothers’ song is now in the “Final Four” of the Tribune’s Cubs victory song contest,  which began in January.

White, who grew up in Downers Grove (IL) and graduated last May with his bachelor’s of business in marketing, is a lifelong Cubs fan, as are his family members “for a few generations,” he explained. (As a former North Side Chicagoan, I too have a fondness for the Cubbies; thus, I can appreciate the White family’s dedication to their team.) The contest’s final showdown—between the two final songs that garner the most votes—is slated to begin next Monday, March 30.

Joey, who works in the Chicagoland area, answered a few questions about his and his brother’s song via email the other day. (And you can vote through 9 a.m. this Sunday, March 29, on the Tribune’s website.)

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Chicago Tribune Cubs Victory Song Contest: "Raise the W" by Jimmy and Joey White

You can vote for the White brothers’ song on the Chicago Tribune website until 9 a.m. Sunday, March 29.

Q: Why did you enter the contest?

Joey: My uncle actually saw the competition while he was reading the ‘Chicago Tribune’ and took a picture and sent it to my brother and me and suggested we create a song and submit it. When I saw the text message, my brother and I both thought it would be fun to do, and we started the process. As lifelong Cubs’ fans, we knew this would be a fun project to complete and share with friends and family.

Q: Tell me about the process of composing the song with your brother.

Joey: My brother lives in Fort Collins, Colorado, now so it was a long-distance project. We have created songs in the past for fun and have a good time doing it. After we decided we were going to create a Cubs song, my brother went to work on the instrumental (guitar, drums, bass). He has always been more inclined with the instruments and composing a beat. When he came up with his idea of how he wanted the song to go, he sent me a rough draft recorded through a text message. When he completed the instrumental, which took about two days, he sent it to me so I could start on the lyrics. I watched some Cubs videos on YouTube and a DVD that I have to help me with some ideas.

The writing process took about another two days, and then I went to my friend Justin Harzich’s house and recorded the song. With the instrumental that my brother sent, we uploaded it onto the program we used to record the song, then sent it back to my brother. After the song was complete, my brother created a video to go along with the song and posted it onto YouTube and emailed the final product to the ‘Chicago Tribune.’

Q: What are you doing now that you’ve graduated from Western?

Joey: At the moment I am gaining professional experience in sales. My future career goals consist of working with Live Nation. I’ve heard it is a great company to work for, and I am very interested in that industry. I’m interested in entertainment, like professional sports and music, and this company works with both.

Q. Anything you would like to highlight about your time at Western?

Joey: I walked on to the baseball team and played in 2012-13. My time at Western was very enjoyable and cherish the experience and education I received from the institution. The years I attended came and went too fast, but are very memorable!

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Hope springs eternal, as the White brothers and all those who entered the contest have demonstrated with their songs. So those of us Leathernecks who are Cubs’ fans keep heart… in this “lucky” (?) “Year of the Goat” — and now with a WIU alumnus possibly the author of the Cubs victory song — just maybe the infamous curse will end its reign!

Florida Firefighter Comes to Campus to Accept Bachelor’s Degree

WIU graduate Tonnie Rollins, right, is pictured with WIU Academic Advisor Ron Pettigrew of the Distant Education Support office during the May 12 graduation ceremony in Macomb.

The strain of a 950-mile road trip is nothing compared to the two-year trek by a Tallahassee, FL firefighter to get his bachelor’s degree from Western Illinois University.

Twenty-one year firefighting veteran Tonnie Rollins has spent the past two years earning his bachelor’s degree from WIU in general studies. He was in Macomb May 12 to walk across the stage to accept his diploma in person.

“I made a promise to myself when I enrolled that when I completed the program I would fly to Macomb and march with my class,” he said. “This was my first trip to Macomb.”

Rollins said he decided to pursue his degree because it was a personal goal and he would like to be a fire chief someday. He is currently a lieutenant with the Tallahassee Fire Department.

Rollins began his studies at WIU during the Fall 2010 semester and said he chose Western because of its affiliation with the National Fire College in Emmitsburg, MD. He said his favorite class was LEJA 481, Advanced Fire Administration.
“It gave me an insight on what administrators deal with on a daily basis,” he said.

For more information about WIU’s General Studies Department, visit www.wiu.edu/distance_learning/bachelor_of_arts_in_general_studies/.

WIU history major creates rural school database during internship

A recent story in the Quincy Herald Whig illustrates how Western students get hands-on experience during their studies at WIU.

Joel Koch, a senior history major at Western Illinois University, shows a couple of the photos of old rural schools in Adams County that he’s found during his internship at the Historical Society of Quincy and Adams County. (H-W Photo/Michael Kipley)

Quincy Herald-Whig photo at left: Joel Koch, a senior history major at Western Illinois University, shows a couple of the photos of old rural schools in Adams County that he’s found during his internship at the Historical Society of Quincy and Adams County. (H-W Photo/Michael Kipley)

“There [are] a lot of people who went to these schools, and many of them have died already,” Koch said. “If their children or grandchildren are doing family research and they run across a reference that they went to a certain school but don’t know where it was, they can refer to our list and get that information.”

According to Edward Husar’s, “Historical Society intern compiles database of old rural schools in Adams County” posted in late November, Joel Koch, a senior history major from Quincy (IL), has compiled a database of nearly 200 rural schools that once operated in Adams County during his internship with the Historical Society of Quincy and Adams County.

Read more at www.whig.com/story/16083102/historical-society-intern-compiles-database-of-former-rural-schools.

Learn more about WIU’s Department of History at www.wiu.edu/cas/history/.

Thunderstruck? Not these guys!

Five WIU students were recently featured on WQAD News for their attempt to chase down a tornado—and they explained why storm spotters are helpful to the National Weather Service, too.

(More, below the image)

screen shot of WQAD news clip

Learn more the meteorology program at WIU, and what makes it one of the very few of its kind in the Midwest.

Kangaroos, emus, and ‘wine science’: WIU Ag students hit Australia

In a recent article from the McDonough County Voice, professor of horticulture Mari Loehrlein poses an interesting question:

“What do you get when you combine 24 college students, a boomerang, a world-famous opera house, and a major agricultural production region? Well, if you stir gently, bake in the hot Australian sun, season with fresh local flavors of your choice (e.g. rugby, fruit bats, and beaches right next to an urban center), I think you’ll get the idea.”

As Professor Loehrlein describes, 24 students from the Western’s School of Agriculture spent 10 days over spring break learning about Australian culture and agriculture, with tours including the Muru Mittigar Aboriginal Culture Center (see photo, below), a citrus orchard, and the wine science program at Charles Sturt University, among other highlights.

(more, below the photo)

image of WIU students visiting Muru Mittigar aboriginal center

Senior agriculture majors Mellisa Herwig (left) and Joe Dickinson (right) with tour guide at the at the Muru Mittigar aboriginal center

To learn more about the trip, read Professor Loehrlein’s highlights, or check out the entire page of trip photos from Professor Jon Carlson’s page!