COAP Employee Spotlight: Seth Miner

Western Illinois University Director of Admissions Seth Miner

“No matter how intense meetings can be or the amount of pressure that comes with working in admissions, I have never dreaded going to work. In admissions, we have an opportunity to open the doors to the future for prospective students and feed off the excitement they have in determining the next chapter in their lives.” — Western Illinois University Director of Admissions Seth Miner

One of the better feelings in life is landing a new job or reaching a career milestone in a field that you love. Seth Miner, Western Illinois University’s new director of undergraduate admissions, has accomplished both with his new post at Western.

The director of admissions at any university can be considered the “hotseat,” depending on many internal and external circumstances that impact students’ choices of where to attend college; thus, it is often considered a stressful job. According to Seth, though, sometimes, that pressure can be useful.

No matter how intense meetings can be or the amount of pressure that comes with working in admissions, I have never dreaded going to work. In admissions, we have an opportunity to open the doors to the future for prospective students and feed off the excitement they have in determining the next chapter in their lives. I also love being challenged, which is something that we face on a daily basis in admissions,” he explained.

Seth agreed to share a bit more about himself in the Council of Administrative Personnel (COAP) Spotlight this month. More about his background and his work at Western so far, is below…

Welcome to Western Illinois University, Seth!

Q. Tell me a bit about your background: How did you wind up working at WIU?

Seth: I was one of those students who never wanted to leave college, as I thoroughly enjoyed my college experience. I began my higher education career as the carpenter for Waldorf College in Forest City, IA. I was a proud alumnus who wanted to work at Waldorf and viewed the job as a foot in the door. After six months working at Waldorf College, a position opened in admissions. I applied, was offered, and accepted the position, and it was at that point that I was hooked!

Admissions is all about building relationships with prospective students and families, promoting the great things the institution has to offer—with the intent of the student choosing to enroll. After two years in admissions, I wanted to see what it was like building those relationships with students (once they were at the institution) as a way of retaining them. I then accepted a position at Luther College in Decorah, IA, in residence life.

At Luther College, I was the area coordinator for a complex that housed 750 upper-class students. It was a great experience, but it did not take long for me to realize I missed the fast-paced life of working in admissions. It was at this time that I got back into admissions at Upper Iowa University in Fayette, IA, as the associate director of admissions there.

During my time at Upper Iowa University, I co-supervised professional staff members, managed an in-state, as well as an out-of-state, territory, and also supervised the admissions student ambassador program and student call team. Up to that point, my experience had been working at small private institutions. I began to search for opportunities at small regional public institutions, as I felt I could incorporate my private experience and practices into public institution recruitment and be successful.

The next chapter in my career was at Bemidji State University in Bemidji, MN, as the associate director of admissions and scholarship coordinator. For two years I held that position, and in it, I also supervised  admissions representatives, in addition to coordinating scholarships and implementing the strategic recruitment plan of the admissions office.

My third and final year at Bemidji State University, I had the opportunity to serve as the interim director of admissions, and my additional responsibilities included coordinating community outreach programs, budget management, strategic planning, and supervising the entire admissions staff of nine professional staff members.

I found success in implementing more of a private recruitment strategy at a public institution. My career goals were to work at a larger public institution, and that is when I came across this opportunity at Western Illinois University.

What sparked my initial interest in WIU was the automatic merit-based scholarship program that WIU has. It is reminiscent of what private institutions do and what I was accustomed to in my past experience.

Another draw to WIU was the cost guarantee and no out-of-state tuition. Higher education is a competitive market, and WIU has made these decisions that will ensure that we are providing a quality education at an affordable price.

Q. What does a typical day at work at Western look like for you so far?

Seth: It has been great getting to meet all the people here at WIU and in the city of Macomb in the two months that I have been at WIU. One of the things that I love about working in admissions is that there is no such thing as a typical day. I often look at my calendar the night before to determine what I have going on the next day and that often changes. I rely heavily on my staff, and make it a point to visit with the processing staff right away in the morning, as it is a busy time of the year for them.

The majority of my days are spent in meetings, as well as looking at data to identify trends that we can capitalize on in the recruitment of students.

Q. What are some of the most challenging aspects of your job?

Seth: I am a competitor and enjoy a good challenge. The biggest challenge that we face in admissions is that our livelihood is determined by the decision-making ability of a 17- to 18-year old. We can do everything right in the recruitment process, provide the students all the information he or she needs about the institution and his or her program of interest, mutually determine that WIU is a good fit and what the student is looking for, and yet, he or she can still decide to go elsewhere. There are many outside variables that beyond our immediate control.

Q. Tell me a little about your favorite activities outside of your job.

Seth: I am currently working on my doctorate degree, so my activities have been limited. However, I do have three children (Brooks, who is 10, Cameron, who is 7, and Kaitlyn, who is 1) that I enjoy taking to the park with my wife (Jennifer). Family is a big part of my life, and the move to Macomb has also brought us closer to extended family. Our two boys are at the age where they are becoming more active in extracurricular activities, such as football, soccer, basketball, and baseball and we are excited to get them involved in all the Macomb community has to offer.

Q. What is your go-to advice?

Seth: My go-to advice would have to be to challenge yourself every day and step out of your comfort zone. It is only when you step out of your comfort zone that you truly find what you are capable of and can continually raise the bar! It is something that I have lived my life by, and if I would not have stepped out of my comfort zone and made an 11-hour move, I would not have had the opportunity to meet so many great individuals here in Macomb and at Western Illinois University.

June COAP Employee Spotlight: Andrea Henderson

If you work at Western, chances are you have met Andrea Henderson. As director of the Western Illinois University Office of Equal Opportunity and Access, Andrea’s job requires she meet many, many employees regularly. In fact, she said that is one the best parts of her job… getting to meet and work with employees from all areas of the University.

Andrea Henderson, Director, Western Illinois University Office of Equal Opportunity and Access

Andrea Henderson, Director, Western Illinois University Office of Equal Opportunity and Access

For the June Western Illinois University Council of Administrative Personnel (COAP) Employee Spotlight, Andrea took time out of her schedule to give us a little bit of background about her career at Western and her dedication to her employer… and her alma mater.

Q. Tell me a bit about your background… How did you wind up working at WIU?

Andrea: My mother worked at WIU and I attended as a student, so I knew that WIU was a great place to work. In 1988, I was hired as a secretary III – trainee in the purchasing office. After completing my trainee program and working in the position for two more years, a vacancy for a purchasing assistant became available. I tested and was interviewed for the position and was hired. I later promoted to purchasing officer. After working in the purchasing office for nine years, I was asked to coordinate the University’s civil service trainee/learner program. I did that for about 10 months while still working half-time in the purchasing office. I was then transferred to a position that reported half-time to Human Resources and half-time to the Affirmative Action (now Equal Opportunity and Access) Office. In that position, I continued to coordinate the trainee/learner program and assisted the Affirmative Action director with employment monitoring, complaint investigation, and ADA compliance. I later promoted to equal opportunity officer. I was in that position for 10 years, and then was hired for a full time position in Human Resources as a human resource manager for classification/compensation. After being in that position for two years, the opportunity to apply for the position of director of the Office of Equal Opportunity and Access became available. I have been in this position since July of 2009.

Q. What does a typical day at work at Western look like for you?

Andrea: Like many administrators, I really do not have a “typical” day. My day-to-day responsibilities include monitoring the search process for faculty and administrative positions, monitoring ADA & Title IX compliance for the campus, and receiving and investigating complaints of discrimination. I never know what’s going to cross my desk on any given day. The day could start with attending regularly scheduled committee meetings and before the day ends, I might have traveled across campus to meet with facilities maintenance on location to discuss an immediate access issue, worked with the Macomb Police Department to retrieve a report (OPS sends them automatically), or participated in an impromptu meeting with administrators, legal counsel, or an employee regarding some pressing issue.

Q. What are some of the best aspects of your job?

Andrea: Through my responsibilities, I come in contact with a lot of people across campus. Western has some amazing employees and it’s my pleasure getting to meet them.

Q. What are some of the most challenging aspects of your job?

Andrea: There are a number of very challenging aspects to my job and some of them keep me up at night. I have a great deal of responsibility in the Office of Equal Opportunity and Access, and the decisions I make can greatly impact people. I take that very seriously, and sometimes it can be very emotionally draining.

Q. Tell me a little about your favorite activities outside of your job.

Andrea: My husband and I are very involved in our church and community. We enjoy volunteerism. We spend a lot of time doing things in the ministry, including special services and Bible study. In the community, my husband is co-founder of a summer youth group, called P.R.I.M.E., so during the spring and summer I assist with that. I am also on several community boards including the Macomb Fire and Police Commission, the Samaritan Well, Big Brothers, Big Sisters, and the Housing Authority of McDonough County. In addition, we love to travel, so when we don’t already have other commitments, we’ll jump in the car and do a road trip or we’ll plan a longer get away to some place we’ve never been. Our most recent travel was a cruise to Montego Bay, Jamaica, the Cayman Islands, and Cozumel, Mexico. Before that, we took a trip up to Canada.

Q. What is your favorite quote? (Or, if you prefer… your go-to advice you give to individuals when they ask you?)

Andrea: Trust God! (favorite quote by unknown… and go-to advice!)

Instructional technologist teaches at Cyber Camp

Teachers may be “off” for the summer, but for many, they’re not resting when it comes to learning about technology and how their students use it. Read about how a WIU instructional technologist helped local teachers learn about staying up-to-date during a summer Cyber Camp.