Tim’s trifecta: WIU employee, alum runs through fire (literally) to support students

“With each race, I offer the opportunity for them to ‘sponsor’ me with a gift to the new scholarship for Phonathon students. In doing so, I want them to feel that my accomplishments in the Spartan Race Series are also their accomplishment in support of our students. The result is some well-deserved assistance for at least one Phonathon student, who through the course of their work, has secured scholarship assistance for many others.” — Tim Hallinan, Western Alumnus and WIU Director of Annual Giving
Tim Hallinan - Spartan Racer

Would you ever run through fire for your job? Or slog through stinky mud? Or heave huge tractor tires around on a hot day?

Tim Hallinan would… and he does! Well… he does it for himself, too, but he also does it to help support Western students.

As the director of annual giving at Western, Tim manages the Student Phonathon Program, which occurs each semester at WIU and employs students who reach out to alumni and parents and ask for support. “Taking a moment to speak with us is a great way to stay connected to Western, ask questions and offer your support to the Annual Fund,” the program’s website states. He also competes in the Spartan Race series, and in 2013, “hit” the trifecta, when he finished three obstacle course race (OCR) challenges in a calendar year.

Tim Hallinan, WIU '95 and the director of annual giving in Western's Foundation and Development Office, earned "Trifecta" status in 2013 in the Spartan Race series.

Tim Hallinan, WIU ’95 and the director of annual giving in Western’s Foundation and Development Office, earned “Trifecta” status in 2013 in the Spartan Race series.

I’ve known Tim, one of the most committed and conscientious people I’ve ever met, for many years (full disclosure… I worked with him at another organization in Macomb, when we were enrolled at WIU as traditionally aged students, and I was in his wedding in what seems like an eternity ago, no offense, Tim ;-). Thus, it was no surprise to me when I heard he was going to compete in these crazy challenges and take his dedication to the next level—for himself, his alma mater, and his employer.

Last December, when his lovely wife, Jeri, posted some more of the photos of his OCR adventures on Facebook, I knew I had to share.

Below is a brief Q&A about his trifecta accomplishment. I think it demonstrates why he is the embodiment of  a WIU #SuccessStory.

Q). Tell me about how you got started doing these Spartan Races. Why punish yourself like this? Isn’t just exercising enough?

A). After my National Guard career, I was looking for something to keep me fit, but also hold my interest. What I found in OCR was exactly that—plus a sense of achievement that is a step beyond a 5K time or number on a scale. There is also a sense of camaraderie among many OCR racers. You experience this on any course in the country when a stranger disregards his or her course time to stop to assist you with an obstacle or vice versa.

Q). What does the “trifecta,” in terms of Spartan racing, mean?

Tim HallinanA). The Spartan Race series includes the Spartan Sprint (3+ miles/15 obstacles), the Super Spartan (8+ miles/20 obstacles,) and the Spartan Beast (12+ miles / 25 obstacles). Completing all three distances in a calendar year earns a racer Trifecta Status, and each racer is awarded a special medal to recognize the accomplishment. Longer and even more challenging courses are offered to elite racers, but I’m not quite up to that level just yet. My latest race was the Texas Spartan Beast on December 14th in Glen Rose, Texas, which was the last race of the year, and the last distance I needed to earn the 2013 Trifecta. I previously completed the Spartan Sprint in Indiana (April 2013) and the Super Spartan in Marseilles, IL (July 2013).

Q). How does one go about training for such a competition?

A). A mistake I made early on was not distinguishing “training” from “working out.” Before my first race in October 2012, I really was not focused on fitness goals or nutrition, and it showed in my race time. Now I understand that training needs to be targeted with specific goals in mind, as well as being mindful of what I eat and when I eat it. I’ve conceded that at age 45 I’m not going to win a Spartan Race and am happy with just finishing. I consider any race in which I beat my previous time or complete obstacles I couldn’t complete before personal “wins.”

WIU Phonathon Students

Students who work for the WIU Student Phonathon Program.

Q). How does competing in these races work with the WIU scholarship fund you established?

A). I’m blessed with many friends, family, and former WIU Phonathon employees who support what I do on the course, as well as on the WIU campus. With each race, I offer the opportunity for them to “sponsor” me with a gift to the new scholarship for Phonathon students. In doing so, I want them to feel that my accomplishments in the Spartan Race Series are also their accomplishment in support of our students. The result is some well-deserved assistance for at least one Phonathon student, who through the course of their work, has secured scholarship assistance for many others.

Q). Are you going to be competing in another one? If so, when?

A). Next up for me is the Indiana Sprint on April 26th. I really enjoy this particular course, and am looking forward to it.

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Student’s design talent lands him summer TV gig

WIU Student Chris Taylor "Duct Tape" Design Segment on KHQA-TV

Chris Taylor, a senior fashion merchandising major in Western Illinois University’s Department of Dietetics, Fashion Merchandising and Hospitality, is bringing his creativity and love of design to the viewers of KHQA-TV (Channel 7) every Friday morning through this August.

For Chris Taylor, his love of fashion and design began at the early age of “6 or 7,” he says, with an auspicious task (assigned by his mom) that involved a stack of old clothes and some Barbie dolls.

Today, at 26, Taylor, a senior fashion merchandising major in Western Illinois University’s Department of Dietetics, Fashion Merchandising and Hospitality (DFMH), is bringing his creativity and love of design to the viewers of KHQA-TV, a Quincy (IL)-based station, every Friday morning through this August.

Taylor—whose designs are frequently based on using “reconsumed” (used), common household, and/or vintage materials (check out his Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ReConsumed4U)—has been appearing on the station’s 5-7 a.m. news show since mid-May in a segment that focuses on “saving on style.” (Taylor said his segments typically air in three segments from 5:30-7 a.m.).

Videos of Taylors segments (so far) can be viewed on KHQA-TV’s YouTube channel.

Taylor took some time out of his busy summer designing schedule to answer a few questions about his background and his love of design, fashion, and making “old” things “new” again.

Q). What interested you in fashion and design before you started attending WIU and majoring in fashion merchandising?

I think it all started when I was about 6 or 7. We had a neighbor with a little girl that was a good friend of my parents. Our moms would take turns watching each of us, and she would tote around all her Barbies back and forth to our house. One day my mom needed a project to keep us busy. She gave us a stack of old clothes, and we decided to make clothes for her Barbies.

While I was in high school I took a job working for the Gap. I realized that I had a passion for fashion—working in fashion retail was more fun than work. I took a few years after high school to work and realized that I had hit a ceiling in my career and felt that I needed to do something different. I packed up and moved from Southern California to Quincy. My mother had shared the cost of living with me here, and it was a no-brainer. I didn’t quite know what I would do when I got here, but I soon decided. I earned my associates in science from JWCC [John Wood Community College]. I decided to continue and earn my bachelor’s degree. Knowing my background, my counselor suggested the fashion merchandising program at WIU.

Q). What kinds of projects do you produce/have you produced as a student in the DFMH dept. at WIU? Any favorites?

Every class has required a project. Each class’s projects vary in form, but all focus on topics related to fashion. Some of my favorites include: creating a trend board, creating a business plan, researching a fashion mart, analyzing the quality aspects of a textile product, constructing a garment, and building multiple visual displays.

Q). Where you do you draw your inspiration from?

My inspiration comes from everywhere, but most of it comes from being CHEAP! I have always loved thrifting because it’s unpredictable; you never know what you are going to find. I refuse to pay full price for anything, and that has driven me to be creative in all aspects of interior furnishings and apparel.

Taylor’s Facebook page, “Reconsumed4U by Chris Taylor,” features photos of the design projects he undertakes, and he provides instructions about how to create similar designs. This t-shirt design project has a custom logo that Taylor applied with a stencil and spray paint.

Q). What interested you in working with “reconsumed” materials?

I have always loved repurposing things and updating them. Since I was young we have shopped thrift stores. I suffered a back injury last year and had some time on my hands, but little extra money. I really needed a creative outlet that would allow me to be product but that cost little-to-no money.

Q). You seem to like to work with a variety of materials and work on a variety of different types of projects. What is your favorite medium?

I can’t say that I have one “favorite” medium. To narrow it down, I will say that with paint or fabric can change anything! Mastering the use of the tools (sewing machines, staple guns, brushes, etc.) that manipulate different media can really encourage creativity.

Q). How did you first appear on KHQA’s morning show (how did the opportunity come about)?

In my visual merchandising class, we were put into groups to construct displays created out of recycled material. Because of some injury-related things, I could not be in class the week of creating the project. I volunteered to work from home and create our outfit and left everyone else to create the background display. After putting our components together I shared a photo with KHQA on Facebook. About a month later, a newscaster emailed me and asked to talk with the creator of the dress. She also wanted to see any other projects that I had made. After my first appearance, I was asked to come back again.

I have always been someone who has taken every opportunity by the horns and guided it in my direction. I talked with a few people and worked out a trial segment that focuses on saving on style that will air during every Friday’s broadcast through August.

Q). What do you hope to do when you graduate?

I had always hoped that upon graduation I would become a visual merchandiser for a large retailer. After my injury, this does not look like it will be a possibility. I am staying positive and researching other options within my field.

Q). Anything else you’d like to highlight (that I didn’t ask you about above)?

The most important thing you can do in school is to really try at every project you are asked to complete, even if you aren’t particularly enthusiastic about. These projects will teach you interpersonal skills that are irreplaceable!

WIU history major creates rural school database during internship

A recent story in the Quincy Herald Whig illustrates how Western students get hands-on experience during their studies at WIU.

Joel Koch, a senior history major at Western Illinois University, shows a couple of the photos of old rural schools in Adams County that he’s found during his internship at the Historical Society of Quincy and Adams County. (H-W Photo/Michael Kipley)

Quincy Herald-Whig photo at left: Joel Koch, a senior history major at Western Illinois University, shows a couple of the photos of old rural schools in Adams County that he’s found during his internship at the Historical Society of Quincy and Adams County. (H-W Photo/Michael Kipley)

“There [are] a lot of people who went to these schools, and many of them have died already,” Koch said. “If their children or grandchildren are doing family research and they run across a reference that they went to a certain school but don’t know where it was, they can refer to our list and get that information.”

According to Edward Husar’s, “Historical Society intern compiles database of old rural schools in Adams County” posted in late November, Joel Koch, a senior history major from Quincy (IL), has compiled a database of nearly 200 rural schools that once operated in Adams County during his internship with the Historical Society of Quincy and Adams County.

Read more at www.whig.com/story/16083102/historical-society-intern-compiles-database-of-former-rural-schools.

Learn more about WIU’s Department of History at www.wiu.edu/cas/history/.